The “immediate need” is to “study the decline of naturally available resources” which is possibly linked with “climate change” said Bhutan Prime Minister Lotay Tshering on Tuesday, while advocating the exploration of technologies to restore the perishing flora. In pre-recorded video messages played at the groundbreaking ceremony of WHO’s Global Čentre for Traditional Medicine (GCTM) in Jamnagar, prime ministers of Bhutan, Bangladesh and Nepal hailed the establishment of GCTM and emphasised the three countries’ historical connection and reliance on traditional medicines. In his message, Bhutan PM Tshering pointed out that such a centre “means a lot” to Bhutan that has been historically known for its medicinal plants.

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Tshering added that Bhutan believes in traditional medicines complementing allopathic medicine for “good health” and considers “integrated medicine as key to wholesome health”: Adding that we should be able to retain authenticity while infusing technology”, Tshering said that for the GCTM being set up in Gujarat with one of the pillars of being research and innovation, “an immediate need would be to study the decline in natural resources, which is probably due to climate change”

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